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Aside
11 Nov

Ghost Town Part Five

Part One, Part Two, Part Three, Part Four, Part SixPart SevenPart EightPart Nine, Part TenPart Eleven

Before we got to the house I needed to change my attire. When I show up on a motorcycle with a leather jacket people are a little unwilling to answer any questions that I have. So I like to put on my teenage attire and pretend I’m doing a report for school or something. I don’t always do that, but for the most part it’s just easier.

I parked the bike down the street and then Dillon and I made the rest of the way by foot. I appreciated that Dillon just didn’t zip ahead of me.

“OK,” I began, “when we are in here I need you to keep the talking to a minimum.”

“Oh, OK,” Dillon said. He looked hurt.

“It isn’t that I don’t want to talk to you but remember what I said about people not seeing you?”

“Yes,” He seemed a little less offended. “What are we going here for?”

“This is the first reported haunting that I found in this town so this seemed like a pretty good place to start.”

“Do you want me to leave?”

“No. I don’t want you to leave.”

“Good.”

I walked up to the front door and rang the doorbell. About 15 seconds later it opened, revealing a gentleman in his mid 40’s.

“Hi,” I said in the nicest voice I could.

“Hello,” he responded. “Can I help you?”

“Yes, My name is Wes and I’m from the community college. I am doing a report on paranormal sightings. I heard about the all of the reports from here and I was wondering if I could ask you a few questions?”

He looked me up and down real quick. “Sure. Come on in. I’m Randy.”

We shook hands and I stepped through the front door. The house was typical. Pictures of people were spread out on a fireplace and on the walls, and a flat screen TV was in the living room. The pictures looked like they were of his family but I didn’t see any of them around. Right away I assumed that one of them might be the one haunting this place.

He offered me a glass of water, which I gladly accepted to not be rude. Plus I was thirsty. I sat on the couch with Dillon next to me. I was glad that he was listening to me so far and remained quiet.

“You have a lovely family,” I told him.

“Thank you,” he replied.

“I don’t mean to be too direct but was there a death recently?”

“No.” He seemed a little confused by that question. “My wife is at work and the kids are at school. I’m a writer so I work from home.”

“Oh,” I said. “Any idea about who the ghost may be?”

Randy started to laugh. It was more sarcastic rather than humorous. “After we bought this house we found out there was a strange death in the house before we bought it.”

“What kind of strange death?” He had my full attention.

“It was 15 years ago, which was more than seven years before we bought so they didn’t have to disclose that information, but there was a woman who lived here by herself. They found her one day with her… uh… with her head severed.”

I didn’t even have to hide the fact that that shocked me. I may kill monsters left and right but finding out about a human that has lost their head still makes me shudder.

“Oh,” I said. “That is strange.”

“Yeah,” he agreed.

“So are the incidents violent?”

“No, not really. So far it has been surprisingly mild. Some doors will open and close by themselves, the lights will turn off and the TV channels will change.”

“That’s because they use up so much electricity and watch nothing but smut!” shouted a woman as she came bursting into the room.

“OH!” I shouted in surprise. She was an older woman with a pink dress covered in flowers and she was holding her head under her right arm. To say that watching a severed head talk was strange would be an extreme understatement.

“Are you OK?” Randy asked me. I nodded my head.

“Yeah,” I lied.

“These people are ridiculous,” the old woman said. “You can’t imagine how much I save them on electricity.”

“Shhh,” Dillon shushed her. “He can’t talk to us right now.”

“Don’t shush me young man. Respect your elders. Are you telling me that he can see and hear me?”

Dillon nodded his head.

“You,” she said to me.

I ignored her.

“I’m speaking to you boy,” she tried again.

“Are you sure your OK?” Randy asked me again. “You don’t look so good.”

“Yeah, I’m OK,” I promised him. “They ever find out what happened?”

Randy shook his head. “Not from what I read. It is really strange.”

“You think it’s strange?” she asked him. “Try waking up with your head on the ground and having to carry it around. I can’t even leave this house.”

“You don’t know how you died?” I asked her.

“Oh, so now you can talk to me.”

“Yes.” I noticed in the corner of my eye that Randy was staring at me like I was crazy but I ignored him.

“No. I don’t know. I just woke up like this to find these people living in my house.”

“Why can none of you remember?”

“Who are you talking to?” Randy blurted.

“Oh. The old woman that is haunting your house.”

“I think I would like you to leave.”

“Good idea.”

“Don’t leave me with these people,” the old woman begged.

I looked over at Dillon. “We should go.”

“OK.”

We both started for the front door with the woman blabbing behind us.

“Oh,” I started. “One more thing.” I flashed my beam of light and erased Randy’s memory of me.

We were walking back to the bike and it was really eating away at me why no one could remember how they died. I felt like I could go house to house and I would never find out anything useful.

“It doesn’t make sense,” I said to Dillon. “Every ghost in this town can’t remember why they died except for you.”

“I don’t remember,” he said.

I stopped walking. “You said you died of a car crash.”

“Yeah, but that’s because my mommy told me that.”

“You talk to your mom?”

“Sometimes, but it’s hard.”

“Where is your mom?”

“She lives at the hospital on the really big hill.”

I knew what one he was talking about. It was a mental institution. She was going to have the answers I needed…

Ghost Town: Part Five

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Posted by on November 11, 2013 in Ghost Town

 

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